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November 2015

Li Huei Tsai, Ph.D. – Jay Van Andel Seminar Series

November 4, 2015 @ 12:00 pm

Title TBD Speaker Information Director, The Picower Institute for Learning and Memory Picower Professor of Neuroscience, Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences Senior associate member, Broad Institute Time & Location 12:00 pm at Van Andel Institute Conference Room 2102/2102 VARI Host: Dr. Darren Moore Questions? For questions, please contact Kim Cousineau at 616.234.5684.

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March 2016

Yoon-Seong Kim, M.D., Ph.D. – Jay Van Andel Seminar Series

March 30, 2016 @ 12:00 pm

New insight into alpha-synuclein regulation in Parkinson’s disease: epigenetic and post-transcriptional regulation Mutations in alpha-synuclein (α-SYN) encoding gene, SNCA were the first reported genetic cause for familiar forms of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and it is the major component in Lewy bodies (LBs) and Lewy neurites (LNs), the accumulation of intraneuronal aggregated proteins. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of expression of α-SYN and pathological processes leading to the formation of LBs/ LNs are unclear. My lab has put in…

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August 2016

Matt LaVoie, Ph.D. – Jay Van Andel Seminar Series

August 17, 2016 @ 12:00 pm

New insights into the pathogenesis of LRRK2 mutation in Parkinson’s disease Matthew J. LaVoie, PhD, is an Associate Professor of Neurology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Pittsburgh in 2000 and completed his postdoctoral fellowship at BWH. In 2005, Dr. LaVoie established an independent research laboratory dedicated to uncovering the earliest molecular events that cause Parkinson’s disease. In addition to his scientific efforts, Dr. LaVoie is also a course…

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James Knowles, Ph.D. – Jay Van Andel Seminar Series

August 24, 2016 @ 12:00 pm

Post-genomic strategies for the study of the psychiatric disorders GWAS strategies have been enormously successfully for the study of the psychiatric disorders.  The number of known genomic loci associated with schizophrenia exceeds that of any other human disease.  Unfortunately, the identification of genomic locations are only the first step down the path of biological understanding and subsequent rational intervention. I will present our efforts to move from "genome-space" to "transcriptome-space" to "brain-space" with examples from several of my laboratory's projects.  Specifically, a study of…

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December 2016

Alice S. Chen-Plotkin, M.D. – Jay Van Andel Seminar Series

December 7, 2016 @ 12:00 pm

From bedside to bench and back again: Toward translation in neurodegenerative disease Alice Chen-Plotkin is a physician-scientist and Associate Professor of Neurology at the University of Pennsylvania, where she runs a research group studying neurodegeneration and treats patients with Parkinson's disease. A Phi Beta Kappa graduate and English literature major at Harvard University, she started her scientific training at Oxford University as a Rhodes Scholar. She then returned to Harvard for medical school and neurology residency training at Massachusetts General Hospital and…

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February 2017

Elizabeth Bradshaw, Ph.D. – Jay Van Andel Seminar Series

February 8, 2017 @ 12:00 pm

Innate immunity, genetics and Alzheimer's disease Dr. Bradshaw received her Ph.D. from Tufts University, Department of Biochemistry, and then joined the Ann Romney Center for Neurologic Diseases at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School as a Research Fellow. In 2014, she was promoted to the rank of Assistant Professor. A main focus of Dr. Bradshaw’s work has been understanding the role of the innate immune system in complex diseases. Currently, one of Dr. Bradshaw’s major research interests is…

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April 2017

Leonard Petrucelli, Ph.D. – Jay Van Andel Seminar Series

April 19, 2017 @ 12:00 pm

Title TBD Speaker Information Leonard Petrucelli, Ph.D. Mayo Clinic Time & Location 12:00 pm at Van Andel Institute Conference Room 2102/2102 VARI Host: Darren Moore, Ph.D. Questions? For questions, please contact Kim Cousineau at 616.234.5684.  

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June 2018

Michel Desjardins, Ph.D. – Jay Van Andel Seminar Series

June 6, 2018 @ 12:00 pm

 A link between gut infection, autoimmune mechanisms and Parkinson’s disease Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by the progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons (DNs). While it affects close to 3% of the population over 75 years of age, a significant proportion of PD patients —  possibly as high as 10% —  develops the disease due to familial, transmitted mutations, at a much earlier age. Two of the genes mutated in early-onset PD, PINK1 and Parkin, are involved in…

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August 2018

Chongyuan Luo, Ph.D. – Jay Van Andel Seminar Series

August 29, 2018 @ 12:00 pm

Single-cell epigenomic profiling uncovers regulatory diversity of brain cell types and diseases The epigenome is an ensemble of chemical modifications of DNA and chromatin. Genome-wide mapping of epigenomic signatures is one of the most effective approaches for identifying gene regulatory elements such as enhancers. Our recent study demonstrated robust classification of brain cell types using single-cell DNA methylation profiles. Single-cell epigenomic approaches enable unbiased mapping of the regulatory landscape for virtually all brain cell populations. As part of the BRAIN…

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September 2020

Valina L. Dawson, Ph.D. – Jay Van Andel Seminar Series

September 9 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Virtual MI United States

Decoding Parkinson’s disease: New therapeutic opportunities Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease. There is currently no therapy that can slow or halt the progression of the disease. Individuals with PD have both motor and non-motor symptoms. While 10-15% of PD is due to genetic mutations the majority of PD is sporadic. It is thought that the neurodegenerative process of PD in both familial and sporadic PD is driven by pathological alpha-synuclein, a presynaptic neuronal protein that…

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